Urea is carried in the bloodstream to the kidneys. ... Urea, together with water and other waste substances, forms the urine as it passes through the nephrons and down the renal tubules of the kidney. From the kidneys, urine travels down two thin tubes called ureters to the bladder.

Water is one of the most common dream symbols and is usually associated with the emotions and the unconscious. Large bodies of water (ocean, lake, pool) usually represent the unconscious itself. ... To be underwater may suggest you are feeling overwhelmed or you are in over your head emotionally or financially.

Being suspended in deep water suggests a state of being emotionally “in limbo.” Falling into oceans and other large bodies of water, similarly, is a metaphor for being in an emotional “free-fall.” ... Next time you have a falling dream, recognize it as a sign that you are feeling emotionally overwhelmed.

In dreams, fire typically symbolizes something new or exciting in your life. It can mean passion, aggression, enlightenment, desire, purification or destruction. Meanwhile, water often symbolizes the opposite mental state. ... When the two symbols are combined in your dream, it often reflects a state of confusion.


Answer: Drink four (4) glasses of water one (1) hour before your exam. Do not empty your bladder. A full bladder helps the sonographer view the pelvic organs. Note: The water should be taken gradually to prevent abdominal discomfort.

In rare cases, drinking an extreme amount in a short time can be dangerous. It can cause the level of salt, or sodium, in your blood to drop too low. That's a condition called hyponatremia. It's very serious, and can be fatal. You may hear it called water intoxication.

Another report shows the development of hyponatremia with water intake of 2.5-5.6 gallons, or 10-20 liters, in just a few hours (5). A case of water intoxication and prolonged hyponatremia also occurred in a healthy, 22-year-old male prisoner after he drank 1.5 gallons (6 liters) of water in 3 hours (1).

“ Drinking too much fluid can lead to hyponatremia, which is when sodium in blood becomes too diluted,” Sims says. Symptoms include confusion, headaches, nausea and bloating—stuff that's easily confused with dehydration. In severe cases, hyponatremia can lead to seizures, organ failure and even death.

There are many different opinions on how much water we should be drinking every day. The health authorities commonly recommend eight 8-ounce glasses, which equals about 2 liters, or half a gallon. This is called the 8×8 rule and is very easy to remember.

“ It depends on your size and weight, and also on your activity level and where you live,” Nessler says. “ In general, you should try to drink between half an ounce and an ounce of water for each pound you weigh, every day.” For example, if you weigh 150 pounds, that would be 75 to 150 ounces of water a day.

We're constantly losing water from our bodies, primarily via urine and sweat. There are many different opinions on how much water we should be drinking every day. The health authorities commonly recommend eight 8-ounce glasses, which equals about 2 liters, or half a gallon.

Here's what happens to your body when you don't drink enough water. ... Any deficit in normal body water – through dehydration, sickness, exercise or heat stress – can make us feel rotten. First we feel thirsty and fatigued, and may develop a mild headache.


A healthy adult bladder can hold up to 16 ounces (2 cups) of urine comfortably, according to the National Institutes of Health. How frequently it fills depends on how much excess water your body is trying to get rid of. Circular muscles called sphincters close tightly to keep urine from leaking.


A healthy person drinking approximately 2 liters of water per day makes 800 to 2000 ml of urine per 24 hours (4). If the urinary system is healthy, the bladder can hold up to 16 ounces (2 cups) of urine comfortably for 2 to 5 hours (5).